October 3, 2022

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Local man sentenced for possessing pornography featuring young children

11 min read

CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas – A 43-year-old Corpus Christi resident has been ordered to federal prison for possessing nearly 1300 images of child pornography, announced U.S. Attorney Jennifer B. Lowery.

Camden Chase Plumb pleaded guilty Oct. 5, 2021.

Today, U.S. District Court Judge Drew B. Tipton ordered Plumb serve a total of 190 months in federal prison. The court considered victim impact statements and took into account Plumb’s previous state conviction for indecency with a minor in determining his sentence. Plumb will also serve 10 years on supervised release following completion of his prison term, during which time he will have to comply with numerous requirements designed to restrict his access to children and the internet. He will also be ordered to register as a sex offender and pay $15,000 in restitution to victims.

In June 2017, authorities learned Plumb had sexually abused a minor. The investigation led to the seizure of his cell phone and a computer he had used. Forensic analysis of the devices resulted in the discovery of 1,058 images of child pornography on his cell phone, and 113 videos and 230 images of child pornography on the computer. Both devices included images depicting prepubescent children being sexually exploited.

Homeland Security Investigations conducted the investigation with the assistance of the FBI and Corpus Christi Police Department.  

Assistant U.S. Attorneys Dennis E. Robinson and Molly K. Smith prosecuted the case, which was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood (PSC), a nationwide initiative the Department of Justice (DOJ) launched in May 2006 to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. U.S. Attorneys’ Offices and the Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section leads PSC, which marshals federal, state and local resources to locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who sexually exploit children and identifies and rescues victims. For more information about PSC, please visit DOJ’s PSC page. For more information about internet safety education, please visit the resources link on that page.

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