December 2, 2022

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Delivery of Humanitarian Assistance in Tigray

16 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

The United States welcomes the arrival today of a truck convoy carrying over 1,700 metric tons of life-saving humanitarian assistance in Tigray. We appreciate the efforts of the government of Ethiopia, Tigrayan regional authorities, and Afar regional authorities in facilitating that delivery. We also commend the United Nations agencies, international organizations, U.S. government partners, and the ongoing efforts of humanitarian organizations across Ethiopia to provide aid to all those in need. We reiterate the importance of significant, sustained, unconditional, and unhindered humanitarian access to Tigray—as well as to all communities that are suffering, including the people in Afar —and the urgency of the resumption of basic services, including electricity, telecommunications, and banking.

The continued commitment of the government of Ethiopia and Tigrayan authorities to a cessation of hostilities remains a critical step toward reconciliation and peace. In that regard, we welcome the withdrawal of Tigrayan forces from Erebti and underscore the importance of further withdrawals from Afar regional state. The parties must continue to build on this progress to advance a negotiated and sustainable end of conflict. Progress toward this goal is an essential foundation for restoration of essential services in Tigray and an inclusive political process to provide security and prosperity for all Ethiopians.

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