December 10, 2022

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Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Dutch Foreign Minister Hoekstra

15 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken met today with Dutch Foreign Minister Wopke Hoekstra in Washington, D.C.  Secretary Blinken and Foreign Minister Hoekstra condemned the atrocities committed by Russia in Bucha and elsewhere in Ukraine, and underscored their support for holding accountable those behind them.  They agreed on the need to continue providing security and humanitarian assistance to Ukraine and to increase pressure on Russia.  The Secretary expressed support for stronger European defense compatible with NATO, and they discussed ways to strengthen European security.  The Secretary thanked Foreign Minister Hoekstra for his country’s exemplary cooperation in addressing semiconductor supply chain shortages and energy volatility and emphasized the positive role of U.S.-Netherlands relations in forging a stronger Transatlantic partnership.  In anticipation of Dutch-American Friendship Day next week, the Secretary highlighted our shared values, strong economic relations, and outstanding political cooperation.

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