December 10, 2022

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Election of Pakistan Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif 

15 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

Pakistan has been an important partner on wide-ranging mutual interests for nearly 75 years and we value our relationship. The United States congratulates newly elected Pakistani Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif and we look forward to continuing our long-standing cooperation with Pakistan’s government.

The United States views a strong, prosperous, and democratic Pakistan as essential for the interests of both of our countries.

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