December 10, 2022

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Welcoming Saudi Arabia and the UAE’s Economic and Humanitarian Support for Yemen

14 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

The United States welcomes the pledge by Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates to provide $2 billion in economic support for the Central Bank of Yemen, as well as the pledge by Saudi Arabia to provide $1 billion for development projects and fuel support. This economic support will help stabilize the economy, improve Yemenis’ access to basic services, and ease the economic crisis that causes so much suffering. The United States looks forward to working with regional, international, and private sector partners to strengthen the Yemeni economy.

At a time when funding gaps have forced humanitarians to cut life-saving assistance for millions of Yemenis, the United States also welcomes Saudi Arabia’s pledge to provide $300 million for the UN’s humanitarian response plan. We hope that this support reaches Yemenis in need as soon as possible. The Yemen humanitarian appeal remains less than forty percent funded, and the United States urges more donors to contribute generously and expeditiously to address the suffering of Yemenis.

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