September 28, 2022

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The United States Welcomes Government Reform in Yemen

8 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

The United States welcomes the announcement of the formation of a Presidential Leadership Council in Yemen. We support the aspirations of the Yemeni people for an effective, democratic, and transparent government that includes diverse political and civil society voices, including women and other marginalized groups. Most importantly, Yemenis deserve a government that protects rights and freedoms while promoting justice, accountability, and reconciliation.

The United States remains committed to helping advance a durable, inclusive resolution to the conflict in Yemen. We urge the Presidential Leadership Council to abide by the UN-negotiated truce and cooperate with comprehensive UN-led efforts to end the conflict. Yemenis must have the opportunity to determine the future of their country. We urge all the parties to choose the path of peace and dialogue.

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