December 2, 2022

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Kentucky Man Indicted for Shooting at and Attempting to Kill a Political Candidate

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WASHINGTON – A federal court in Louisville, Kentucky, unsealed an indictment today charging a Louisville man for interfering with a federally protected right, and using and discharging a firearm in relation to a crime of violence by shooting at and attempting to kill a candidate for elective office.

According to court documents, Quintez O. Brown, 21, of Louisville, discharged a firearm in an attempt to interfere with victim C.G.’s mayoral campaign in Louisville and to intimidate C.G. from campaigning as a candidate for mayor in the Louisville primary election.

The defendant made an initial court appearance today before U.S. Magistrate Judge Colin H. Lindsay of the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Kentucky. The initial appearance will continue tomorrow. If convicted of all charges, he faces a mandatory minimum of 10 years in prison and maximum sentence of life in prison. A federal district court judge will determine any sentence after considering the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.

Assistant Attorney General Kenneth A. Polite Jr. of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Michael A. Bennett of the Western District of Kentucky, and Special Agent in Charge Jodi Cohen of the FBI’s Louisville Field Office made the announcement.

The investigation is being conducted by the FBI’s Louisville Field Office and the Louisville Metro Police Department as part of FBI Louisville’s Public Corruption Civil Rights Task Force.

Trial Attorney Jolee Porter of the Justice Department’s Public Integrity Section and Assistant U.S. Attorney Amanda E. Gregory from the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Kentucky are prosecuting the case.

An indictment is merely an allegation, and all defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

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