October 3, 2022

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Department of State Offers Reward for Information to Bring Transnational Criminal to Justice

14 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

The Department of State is offering a reward of up to $5 million for information leading to the arrest and/or conviction of Semion Mogilevich, a longtime transnational criminal currently living in Russia.  Mogilevich is wanted in the United States for his alleged participation between 1993 and 1998 in a multi-million dollar scheme to defraud thousands of investors related to a public company headquartered in Newtown, Pennsylvania.  The scheme collapsed in 1998 after thousands of investors lost more than $150 million.  Mogilevich was indicted in 2002 and again in 2003.

This reward is offered under the Department of State’s Transnational Organized Crime Rewards Program (TOCRP), which the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs manages in close coordination with federal law enforcement partners and other U.S. government agencies.  More than 75 transnational criminals and major narcotics traffickers have been brought to justice under the TOCRP and the Narcotics Rewards Program (NRP) since the NRP’s inception in 1986, with the Department paying more than $135 million in rewards for information to-date.

Any information in response this reward offer should be directed to the FBI at +1-800-225-5324 (Voice), +1-215-839-6844 (WhatsApp), or online at https://tips.fbi.gov .

For more information on the individuals listed above and the TOCRP, please see https://www.state.gov/bureau-of-international-narcotics-and-law-enforcement-affairs/inl-rewards-program/.

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