September 29, 2022

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Huffman resident pleads guilty to unlawfully dealing firearms

22 min read

HOUSTON – A 54-year-old man has admitted to engaging in the sale of firearms without a license, announced U.S. Attorney Jennifer B. Lowery.

Craig Lindsey Cornelison admitted he unlawfully sold at least 200 guns from September 2019 to December 2020.

The investigation began after Cornelison purchased over 90 lower receivers within a four-month period in approximately March 2020. He sold firearms primarily as private sales at gun shows throughout the Houston area. Law enforcement discovered numerous firearms were being trafficked overseas to foreign countries, including Iraq. 

The United States seeks to forfeit over 100 firearms that were involved in the unlawful business and approximately $147,747 in proceeds gained from the sales.

U.S. District Judge Andrew Hanen accepted the plea and set sentencing for Aug. 8. At that time, Cornelison faces up to five years in prison and a possible $250,000 maximum fine.

The FBI and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives conducted the investigation. Assistant U.S. Attorneys Steven Schammel and Heather Winter are prosecuting the case.

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