October 3, 2022

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Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Jamaican Prime Minister Holness

16 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken met with Jamaican Prime Minister Andrew Holness Friday in Washington, D.C. to commemorate 60 years of diplomatic relations with the United States, as Jamaica marks the 60th anniversary of its independence.  On behalf of the people and Government of the United States, the Secretary congratulated Jamaicans everywhere and noted our countries’ longstanding, vibrant relationship.  The United States and Jamaica are partners in promoting security and stability, democracy and human rights, and inclusive economic recovery throughout the hemisphere.  The Secretary looks forward to working with the Prime Minister on a full range of issues from reversing the tide of climate change to countering transnational crime and irregular migration, expanding trade and investment opportunities, and creating an inclusive and secure digital future.

Secretary Blinken thanked the Prime Minister for Jamaica’s principled stance in condemning Russia’s unprovoked invasion of Ukraine and his country’s support for the Ukrainian people.  Jamaica stands with people around the world in upholding the principles of the United Nations charter in respecting territorial integrity, sovereignty, and the peaceful resolution of disputes.  The Secretary and Prime Minister also discussed our partnership to improve healthcare outcomes in Jamaica and welcomed Jamaica’s participation in the upcoming Summit of the Americas.

Secretary Blinken and Prime Minister Holness agreed that their governments will carry on these bilateral discussions at a working group on security and development issues followed by the next meeting of the U.S. – Jamaica Strategic Dialogue.

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