October 1, 2022

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OHRP Research Community Forum “Embracing Diversity and Innovation in Research” with Northwell Health, virtual on May 11-12

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At HHS we fight every day to improve the health and well-being of all Americans, especially those marginalized by discrimination and social and political factors. Many of the advances in medicine and public health essential to this effort require research and clinical trials that rely on volunteers. We understand that protecting the rights, welfare, and well-being of research participants is crucial to promoting public trust in research and ensuring the engagement of diverse communities. This protection remains our highest priority.

The mission of the Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health is to protect the rights, welfare, and well-being of people who participate in research studies that HHS supports or conducts. This spring, OHRP will co-sponsor a two-day virtual Research Community Forum on May 11th and 12th with Northwell Health, Feinstein Institutes of Medical Research, titled “Embracing Diversity and Innovation in Research.” Day one of the forum will focus on the importance of promoting and ensuring diversity and access in clinical research participation, with a keynote address given by Dr. Jonathan Jackson of the Harvard Medical School. Dr. Jackson will discuss the value of inclusivity in research, how to attain diversity in recruitment through innovative and inclusive clinical trial designs, community engagement and education, and how institutions can offer their crucial support. The day one agenda will include sessions on a more just public health and research landscape, conducting research with LGBTQI+ and Indigenous participants in culturally affirming ways, and ethical considerations for including pregnant women in clinical research.

Day two will feature a plenary session exploring the tension between providing treatment and conducting research. This live panel session invites frontline physicians and researchers involved in the pandemic to discuss managing patients’ expectations for effective treatment on the one hand and the need for rigorous research during a medical crisis on the other. The day two agenda will include sessions on ethical frameworks for prioritizing clinical trials during the pandemic and beyond, unusual clinical practices that masquerade as standard care, and ethical considerations for innovative clinical trial designs.

The two-day event will feature presentations from experts, including bestselling author Dr. David Fajgenbaum, Geisinger Health System’s Dr. Michelle Meyer, and many others!

Our mission to enhance the health and well-being of all Americans and foster sound, sustained advances in medicine and health requires us to stay informed and committed to promoting ethical research practices. I hope that you will join me and our OHRP colleagues at this two-day event!

For details on the agenda and information about registration, visit:
https://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/education-and-outreach/research-community-forum-may-11-12-2022/index.html

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