December 6, 2022

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Joint Statement from The Working Group on Resettlement to Showcase U.S. Resettlement Programs Nationally and in Colorado

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Office of the Spokesperson

On Tuesday, March 29, representatives from the United States and nine other governments, alongside additional non-governmental organizations from the United States and other countries, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, local government, and academia convened a three-day workshop to share best practices and innovations in refugee resettlement.

This Working Group on Resettlement is being held in Denver, Colorado to showcase U.S. resettlement programs locally and nationally that assist newly arrived refugees to integrate into U.S. communities. The Working Group will highlight the process of reception and integration of refugees, the strong partnerships between federal, state, and local governments, the critical role played by the non-governmental sector in service delivery, and the recent overwhelming response from private citizens to help support the large numbers of Afghans and other refugees being assisted throughout the United States.

Successful refugee resettlement would not be possible without the support of local communities; faith-based organizations; local and state governments; and congressional offices.  We are grateful for the hospitality and welcome that the people of Denver and Colorado more broadly have provided to us this week, as well as the generous welcome communities across the United States provide to refugees who have fled persecution and are making a new life for themselves and their families.

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