September 28, 2022

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Department of State Begins Construction on New U.S. Consulate General in Lagos, Nigeria

14 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

At a historic groundbreaking ceremony highlighting the enduring bilateral friendship and partnership between the United States and Nigeria, Lagos State Governor Babajide Sanwo-Olu joined U.S. Ambassador Mary Beth Leonard and U.S. Consul General Claire Pierangelo on Thursday to officially mark the beginning of construction of a new, modern U.S. Consulate General in Lagos.

Located on a 12.2-acre site in the rapidly developing Eko Atlantic City on Victoria Island, the new U.S. Consulate General in Lagos will support diplomatic and commercial relations between the United States and Nigeria and will provide U.S. and Nigerian Consulate employees with a safe, secure, sustainable, and modern workplace.  The construction project will take approximately five years, with completion expected in 2027.

Ennead Architects LLP of New York is the design architect, Pernix Federal, LLC of Lombard, Illinois, is the design/build contractor, and EYP, Inc. of Albany, New York, is the architect of record.  A variety of energy efficiency strategies will be incorporated into the site and building design to address varied seasonal conditions and to significantly reduce energy demand.

The new Consulate construction project will directly benefit the Nigerian people.  Over the course of construction, an estimated $95 million will be invested in the local economy through local subcontractors, and suppliers.  Overall, the project will employ approximately 2,500 Nigerian citizens, including engineers, architects, artisans, construction workers, and administrative staff.

Since the start of the Department’s Capital Security Construction Program in 1999, OBO has completed 171 new diplomatic facilities.  OBO currently has more than 50 active projects either in the design phase or under construction worldwide.

OBO provides safe, secure, functional, and resilient facilities that represent the U.S. government to the host nation and that support U.S. diplomats in advancing U.S. foreign policy objectives abroad.

For further information, please contact Christine Foushee at FousheeCT@state.gov or visit www.state.gov/obo.

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