October 3, 2022

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Two Individuals Convicted at Trial of Tax Fraud Scheme

20 min read

A federal jury in Greenbelt, Maryland, convicted a North Carolina woman and a Maryland man yesterday for conspiring to defraud the United States, helping file false tax returns, and stealing government funds.

According to evidence presented at trial, between 2013 and 2016, Sandra Denise Curl, of Charlotte, North Carolina, and Percy Leroy Jacobs, of Prince Frederick, Maryland, filed tax returns on behalf of multiple fraudulent trusts they owned, seeking refunds to which they were not entitled. Curl and Jacobs also filed false individual tax returns in their own names, claiming fictitious false tax withholdings in order to generate refunds. In total, the defendants attempted to defraud the IRS of more than $2.2 million.

Curl and Jacobs are scheduled to be sentenced on July 7. Both defendants face a maximum penalty of five years in prison for conspiracy to defraud the United States, three years in prison for each count of aiding and assisting the filing of a false tax return, and 10 years in prison for theft of government property. A federal district court judge will determine any sentence after considering the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines and other statutory factors.

Acting Deputy Assistant Attorney General Stuart M. Goldberg of the Justice Department’s Tax Division and U.S. Attorney Erek L. Barron for the District of Maryland made the announcement.

IRS-Criminal Investigation is investigating the case.

Trial Attorneys Jeffrey McLellan and George Meggali of the Tax Division and Assistant U.S. Attorney Michael Morgan for the District of Maryland are prosecuting the case.

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For example, our survey data identified 19 organizations with 107 initiatives being developed to combat cell phone-triggered IEDs. While the concentration of initiatives in itself does not constitute duplication, this concentration taken together with the high number of different DOD organizations that are undertaking these initiatives and JIEDDO’s inability to identify and compare C-IED initiatives, demonstrates overlap and the potential for duplication of effort. According to JIEDDO officials, the organization has a robust coordinating process in place that precludes unintended overlap. 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    In U.S GAO News
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