December 6, 2022

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U.S.-EU Consultations Underscore Shared Commitment to Human Rights

16 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

Today, Acting Assistant Secretary for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor Lisa Peterson hosted the 2022 U.S.-EU Human Rights Consultations in Washington, D.C.  EU Special Representative for Human Rights Eamon Gilmore led the European Union delegation for this series of meetings.

The United States and the European Union reaffirmed their strong commitment to the transatlantic partnership and discussed challenges to democracy and human rights around the world, emphasizing the need to hold the Russian Federation accountable for its war of aggression in Ukraine and the importance of cooperation in effectively promoting respect for human rights, democracy, and the rule of law.

Throughout the day, State Department and EU officials covered a range of human rights issues present in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America.  Discussions also focused on U.S.-EU cooperation in multilateral fora and on issues pertaining to technology and human rights, business and human rights, disability rights, and protection of underrepresented communities – including historical racially and ethnically marginalized communities, LGBTQI+ persons, and women and girls.  Participants also discussed efforts to defend against authoritarianism, promote respect for human rights, and fight corruption in the Summit for Democracy’s Year of Action.

Against the backdrop of Putin’s unprovoked and unjust war of choice against Ukraine, the discussions demonstrated that the transatlantic alliance is strong and continues to address human rights challenges at home and abroad.

For media inquiries, please contact DRL-Press@state.gov.

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