October 4, 2022

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Sexual Assault: DOD and Coast Guard Should Ensure Laws Are Implemented to Improve Oversight of Key Prevention and Response Efforts

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Department of Defense The Secretary of Defense should ensure that the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness, in collaboration with the Director of the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office and the Secretaries of the military departments, include all required information in DOD annual reports, and if any required information is not included, explain why, and whether there is a plan to include it in future annual reports. (Recommendation 1)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of the Army The Secretary of the Army should ensure all required information is included in the annual reports. (Recommendation 2)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of the Navy The Secretary of the Navy should ensure that the Navy and the Marine Corps include all required information in the annual reports. (Recommendation 3)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of the Air Force The Secretary of the Air Force should ensure all required information is included in the annual reports. (Recommendation 4)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of Defense The Secretary of Defense should ensure that the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness—in collaboration with the Director of the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office and the Secretaries of the military departments—sets a timeframe to establish, and establishes, an evaluation plan and mechanisms for assessing the effectiveness of the SAPR program and related activities—such as policies and training—in achieving its intended outcomes, as required by section 1602(c) and 1612(a) and (b) of the Ike Skelton National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2011 and section 545(a) of the NDAA for Fiscal Year 2017. (Recommendation 5)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of the Army The Secretary of the Army should review and update guidance, and set a timeframe for completion, to ensure compliance with statutory requirements related to the consistent tracking of command climate assessments in the applicable database, as required by section 1721 of the NDAA for Fiscal Year 2014 and Army guidance. (Recommendation 6)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of the Navy The Secretary of the Navy should ensure that the Commandant of the Marine Corps reviews and updates Marine Corps guidance, and sets a timeframe for completion, to ensure compliance with statutory requirements related to including command climate information in commanders’ performance evaluations and assessments, as required by section 508 of the Carl Levin and Howard P. “Buck” McKeon NDAA for Fiscal Year 2015. (Recommendation 7)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of the Air Force The Secretary of the Air Force should review and update guidance, and set a timeframe for completion, to ensure compliance with statutory requirements related to including command climate information in commanders’ performance evaluations and assessments, as required by section 508 of the NDAA for Fiscal Year 2015. (Recommendation 8)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of Defense The Secretary of Defense should review and update policy or establish policy, and set a timeframe for completion, to ensure alignment with sexual assault prevention and response statutory requirements, specifically section 1741(a)-(c) and (f) of the NDAA for Fiscal Year 2014, in coordination with Secretary of the Army as the DOD Executive Agent of the United States Military Entrance Processing Command. (Recommendation 9)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of the Army The Secretary of the Army should review and update policy or establish policy, and set a timeframe for completion, to ensure alignment with sexual assault prevention and response statutory requirements, specifically section 582(a) of the NDAA for Fiscal Year 2012, and section 520(a) of the NDAA for Fiscal Year 2018. (Recommendation 10)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of the Navy The Secretary of the Navy should review and update policy or establish policy, and set a timeframe for completion, to ensure alignment with sexual assault prevention and response statutory requirements, specifically section 1741(a)-(c) and (f) of the NDAA for Fiscal Year 2014. (Recommendation 11)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of the Navy The Secretary of the Navy should ensure that the Commandant of the Marine Corps reviews and updates policy or establishes policy, and sets a timeframe for completion, to ensure alignment with sexual assault prevention and response statutory requirements, specifically, section 1745(a)-(c) of the NDAA for Fiscal Year 2014 and updates such policies for compliance with the statute. (Recommendation 12)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of the Army The Secretary of the Army should take steps to ensure compliance with section 535(a)-(b) of the NDAA for Fiscal Year 2018 by—for example— documenting relevant actions in policy or other relevant guidance. (Recommendation 13)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of the Navy The Secretary of the Navy should take steps to ensure compliance with section 535(a)-(b) of the NDAA for Fiscal Year 2018 by—for example— documenting relevant actions in policy or other relevant guidance. (Recommendation 14)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of the Air Force The Secretary of the Air Force should take steps to ensure compliance with section 535(a)-(b) of the NDAA for Fiscal Year 2018 by—for example—documenting relevant actions in policy or other relevant guidance. (Recommendation 15)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of the Army The Secretary of the Army should ensure that the Superintendent of the United States Military Academy West Point takes steps to document actions, including the dissemination of the resource guide, taken in accordance with section 545(a)-(c) of the John S. McCain NDAA for Fiscal Year 2019. (Recommendation 16)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of the Navy The Secretary of the Navy should ensure that the Superintendent of the United States Naval Academy takes steps to document actions taken in accordance with section 545(a)-(c) of the John S. McCain NDAA for Fiscal Year 2019. (Recommendation 17)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of the Air Force The Secretary of the Air Force should ensure that the Superintendent of the United States Air Force Academy takes steps to document actions, including the dissemination of the resource guide, taken in accordance with section 545(a)-(c) of the John S. McCain NDAA for Fiscal Year 2019. (Recommendation 18)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of Defense The Secretary of Defense should ensure that the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness, in collaboration with the Director of the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office and the Secretaries of the military departments, establishes an oversight structure that includes mechanisms to consistently track and document implementation of ongoing and future NDAA statutory requirements related to sexual assault prevention and response to ensure compliance with applicable laws and improve oversight of its SAPR program. (Recommendation 19)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of Homeland Security The Secretary of Homeland Security should ensure that the Commandant of the Coast Guard, in collaboration with the Director of Health, Safety & Work Life Directorate, reviews and updates policy or establishes policy, and sets a timeframe for completion, to ensure alignment with sexual assault prevention and response statutory requirements, specifically, sections 1712 and 1745(a)-(c) of the NDAA for Fiscal Year 2014. (Recommendation 20)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of Homeland Security The Secretary of Homeland Security should ensure that the Commandant of the Coast Guard, in collaboration with the Director of Health, Safety & Work Life Directorate, implements the education and training on sexual assault prevention and response for individuals enlisted under a delayed entry program by—for example—documenting such training in policy or other relevant guidance to ensure compliance with section 535(a)-(b) of the NDAA for Fiscal Year 2018. (Recommendation 21)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of Homeland Security The Secretary of Homeland Security should ensure that the Commandant of the Coast Guard publishes quarterly reports related to the processing and outcomes of claims reviewed by the Discharge Review Boards to ensure compliance with section 521(b) of the NDAA for Fiscal Year 2018. (Recommendation 22)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

Department of Homeland Security The Secretary of Homeland Security should ensure that the Commandant of the Coast Guard, in collaboration with the Director of Health, Safety & Work Life Directorate, establishes an oversight structure that includes mechanisms to consistently track and document implementation of ongoing and future NDAA statutory requirements related to sexual assault prevention and response to ensure compliance with applicable laws and improve oversight of its SAPR program. (Recommendation 23)

Open

When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

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