October 1, 2022

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Deputy Secretary Sherman’s Meeting with Israeli Knesset Speaker Levy

19 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Deputy Secretary of State Wendy Sherman met with Israeli Speaker of the Knesset Mickey Levy earlier today in Washington. They discussed global security challenges, including Iran and President Putin’s war of aggression in Ukraine.  Deputy Secretary Sherman reiterated the strength of the U.S.-Israel relationship and offered condolences on the murder of two Israeli border police officers in a terrorist attack on March 27.  Deputy Secretary Sherman and Speaker Levy discussed the Knesset’s work to create stronger societal cohesion and ease intercommunal relations.  Deputy Secretary Sherman also emphasized the importance of Israelis and Palestinians enjoying equal measures of security, freedom, and prosperity.  She encouraged steps to improve the quality of life for the Palestinian people, and restraint from steps that exacerbate tensions and undercut efforts to advance a negotiated two-state solution.

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