October 4, 2022

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Declaration of a Humanitarian Truce by the Government of Ethiopia

17 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

The United States welcomes and strongly supports the declaration today by the Government of Ethiopia of an indefinite humanitarian truce, effective immediately, and the commitment to work in collaboration with humanitarian organizations to expedite the unimpeded delivery of humanitarian assistance to all those in need.  We expect this declaration to be quickly followed by the movement of life-saving assistance.

This commitment to a cessation of hostilities should be a critical step towards the resumption and sustainment of humanitarian assistance to the people in Tigray and all Ethiopian regions and communities in need.  It should also serve as an essential foundation of an inclusive political process to achieve progress towards common security and prosperity for all the people of Ethiopia.  In the context of this commitment, we reiterate our call for an immediate end to the violence committed against civilians by all parties to the conflict and underscore that any lasting solution to the conflict must involve accountability for those responsible for atrocities.

The United States urges all parties to build on this announcement to advance a negotiated and sustainable ceasefire, including necessary security arrangements.  The United States will continue to do everything possible to assist and to help the people of Ethiopia to advance a peaceful future.

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