October 2, 2022

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Condemnation of Houthi Terrorist Attacks on Saudi Arabia

16 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

We strongly condemn this week’s multiple Houthi terrorist attacks on Saudi Arabia, including today’s that struck an Aramco facility in Jeddah, which is clearly civilian infrastructure.

At a time when the parties should be focused on de-escalation and bringing needed life-saving relief to the Yemeni people ahead of the holy month of Ramadan, the Houthis continue their destructive behavior and reckless terrorist attacks striking civilian infrastructure.

We will continue to work with our Saudi partners to strengthen their defenses while also seeking to advance a durable end to the conflict, improve lives, and create the space for Yemenis to determine their own future collectively.

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