October 2, 2022

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Tajikistan Travel Advisory

13 min read

Do not travel to Tajikistan due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Tajikistan due to terrorism

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has not issued a Travel Health Notice for Tajikistan due to COVID-19, indicating an unknown level of COVID-19 in the country. Your risk of contracting COVID-19 and developing severe symptoms may be lower if you are fully vaccinated with an FDA authorized vaccine. Before planning any international travel, please review the CDC’s specific recommendations for vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers.

Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 and related restrictions and conditions in Tajikistan.

Terrorist organizations are known to have a presence in the region and have targeted foreigners and local authorities in recent years, including attacks on Western bicyclists in 2018 and a government border post in 2019.

Border Areas with Afghanistan

The current political situation in Afghanistan creates a challenging and unpredictable environment in the border areas due to evolving security conditions. The U.S. Embassy recommends that U.S. citizens reconsider travel near and along Tajikistan’s border with Afghanistan. U.S. citizens should remain alert and avoid activities that develop predictable patterns of movement. If documenting travel on social media, please ensure your privacy settings are appropriately set.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Tajikistan:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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