December 6, 2022

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Taiwan Travel Advisory

8 min read

Reconsider travel to Taiwan due to COVID-19-related travel restrictions.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 1 Travel Health Notice for Taiwan for COVID-19, indicating a low level of COVID-19 in Taiwan. Your risk of contracting COVID-19 and developing severe symptoms may be lower if you are fully vaccinated with an FDA authorized vaccine. Before planning any international travel, please review the CDC’s specific recommendations for vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers.

There are restrictions in place affecting U.S. citizen entry into Taiwan. Visit the American Institute’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 and related restrictions and conditions in Taiwan.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Taiwan:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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