December 10, 2022

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Burma (Myanmar) Travel Advisory

19 min read

Do not travel to Burma due to COVID-19 as well as areas of civil unrest and armed conflict.

On February 14, the Department authorized the voluntary departure of non-emergency U.S. government employees and their family members. On March 30, the Department updated that status to ordered departure.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 4 Travel Health Notice for Burma due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19. Your risk of contracting COVID-19 and developing severe symptoms may be lower if you are fully vaccinated with an FDA authorized vaccine. Before planning any international travel, please review the CDC’s specific recommendations for vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers.

Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 and related restrictions and conditions in Burma.

The Burmese military has detained and deposed elected government officials. Protests and demonstrations against military rule have occurred and are expected to continue.

In addition to nation-wide protests and demonstrations, the following areas of Burma are subject to heightened civil unrest or armed conflict:

  • Matupi township in Chin State
  • Bhamo and Mogaung townships in Kachin State  
  • Hopang, Hseni, Hsipaw, Mongkaung, Namhsan, Namtu, and Nanhkan townships in Shan State
  • Shadaw township in Kayah State
  • Paletwa township in Chin State
  • Hpakan, Mansi, Momauk, Sumprabum, Tanai, and Waingmaw townships in Kachin State
  • Hpapun township in Kayin State Konkyan, Kutkai, Kyaukme, Laukkaing, Matman, Mongmao, Muse, Namphan, Pangsang, and Pangwaun townships in Shan State

The following areas of Burma are especially subject to civil unrest and armed violence due to fighting between the Burmese military and various ethnic armed groups and militia forces.

  • Northern Shan State
  • Parts of Kachin, Rakhine, and Chin States
  • The Naga Self-Administered Zone in northern Sagaing Region

Conflict-affected areas, particularly Northern Shan State and parts of Kachin, Rakhine, and Chin States are subject to land mines and unexploded ordnance. Land mines and unexploded ordnance have injured foreign tourists in conflict-affected areas, and their locations are often not marked or otherwise identifiable.

Read the Burma (Myanmar) country information page.

If you decide to travel to Burma:

Parts of Rakhine, Chin, Kachin, Kayah, Kayin, Sagaing, and Shan States

Some townships in the states listed above are subject to fighting between the Burmese military and armed insurgent groups. The level of risk varies significantly between townships and may change at any time.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in these townships as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel to these locations.

Review information on Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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