September 28, 2022

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Bhutan Travel Advisory

12 min read

Do not travel to Bhutan due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level Four Travel Health Notice due to COVID-19, indicating a very high level of COVID-19 in the country. Your risk of contracting COVID-19 and developing severe symptoms may be lower if you are fully vaccinated with an FDA authorized vaccine. Before planning any international travel, please review the CDC’s specific recommendations for vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers.

Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 and related restrictions in Bhutan.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Bhutan:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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