October 4, 2022

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Mother and son indicted for dealing counterfeit goods

15 min read

LAREDO, Texas – A South Korean woman and a local Texan have been indicted for trafficking counterfeit goods, announced U.S. Attorney Jennifer B. Lowery.

A federal grand jury returned the two-count indictment against Bok Nyo Kim, 72, a legal permanent residing in Laredo, and Henry Yuseok Kim, 45, Laredo. Both were originally charged by criminal complaint. They are expected to appear before U.S. Magistrate Judge Diana Song Quiroga for their initial appearance on the indictment in the near future.

The investigation began Feb. 3. At that time, Henry Kim, part-owner of Fashion Outlet, allegedly sold a counterfeit t-shirt purporting to be Louis Vuitton. Authorities then seized approximately 346 items of counterfeit merchandise from the store, according to the charges. The indictment alleges that during the seizure, Bok Kim identified herself as part-operator of Fashion Outlet.

According to the complaint, both admitted to selling counterfeit clothing at Fashion Outlet for financial gain and shared control over the business. Bok Kim allegedly admitted to purchasing counterfeit merchandise from wholesalers in California. The indictment further alleges both individuals had knowledge of a prior seizure notice authorities had sent.  

If convicted, both face up to 10 years in prison as well as a possible $250,000 maximum fine.

Homeland Security Investigations conducted the investigation. Assistant U.S. Attorney Matthew Isaac is prosecuting the case.

An indictment is a formal accusation of criminal conduct, not evidence. A defendant is presumed innocent unless convicted through due process of law.

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