October 3, 2022

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Felon guilty of illegally owning rifles and shotguns

19 min read

CORPUS CHRISTI, Texas – A 33-year-old Huntsville resident has admitted to being a felon in possession of multiple firearms, announced U.S. Attorney Jennifer B. Lowery.

On March 10, 2021, authorities pulled over a vehicle for having an expired Texas temporary tag. Alonzo Gonzalez III was a passenger in the vehicle.

Law enforcement officers noticed the occupants of the vehicle were behaving suspiciously and brought a K9 to the scene. The K9 alerted to the rear of the vehicle. A subsequent search resulted in the discovery of seven firearms concealed inside the trunk. Those included two 12-gauge shotguns, a .243 rifle, .223-5.56 rifle and three 7.62x54R rifles. Authorities later determined that two of the weapons were stolen.

Gonzalez admitted he had placed the firearms in the trunk and planned to sell them in South Texas.

U.S. District Judge Nelva Ramos will impose sentence on June 22. If found to be an armed career criminal, Gonzalez will face a minimum of 15 years in federal prison and a possible $250,000 fine.

He has been and will remain in custody pending sentencing.

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives conducted the investigation with the assistance of the Kleberg County Attorney Specialized Crimes & Enforcement Task Force. Assistant U.S. Attorney Amanda L. Gould is prosecuting the case.

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