September 28, 2022

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Leader of Guatemalan Drug Trafficking Organization and Guatemalan Politician Indicted for International Cocaine Trafficking

19 min read

A federal court in the District of Columbia today unsealed two separate indictments charging Aler Baldomero Samayoa-Recinos, aka Chicharra, and his son-in-law Freddy Arnoldo Salazar Flores, aka Fredy, Freshco, Boyca, Boyka, Torojo, Flaquillo, and Flaco, with conspiracy to distribute five kilograms of cocaine for importation to the United States. Salazar Flores is a representative of the Central American Parliament (PARLACEN).

A grand jury in the District of Columbia returned an indictment against Samayoa-Recinos on Aug. 1, 2018. According to court documents, beginning as early as 2006 and through 2016, Samayoa-Recinos allegedly conspired with others to import more than five kilograms of cocaine into the United States from Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico.

A grand jury in the District of Columbia returned an indictment against Salazar Flores on May 30, 2017. According to court documents, beginning as early as 2010 and through May 2017, Salazar Flores allegedly conspired with others to import more than five kilograms of cocaine into the United States from Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico. 

This case was supported by the Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF). The DEA’s Bilateral Investigations Unit and Guatemala Country Office are investigating the case.

Trial Attorneys Imani Hutty, Teresita Mutton, and Doug Meisel of the Criminal Division’s Narcotic and Dangerous Drug Section are prosecuting the case. The Criminal Division’s Office of Enforcement Operations and Office of International Affairs provided significant assistance.

An indictment is merely an allegation, and all defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

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