September 29, 2022

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2022 Turkmenistan Presidential Election

11 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

The United States reaffirms our commitment to the people of Turkmenistan and their right to choose their leaders through free and fair elections and in a transparent manner.

We concur with the concerns described in the recent needs assessment conducted by the Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR) of the Organization for Security and Co-Operation in Europe.  The ODIHR assessment noted that Turkmenistan has not proved its election processes to be free, fair, or competitive.  We call on the Government of Turkmenistan to implement ODIHR recommendations in order to align its electoral system with the standards described in the needs assessment.

The growing partnership between the United States and Turkmenistan is based on respect for Turkmenistan’s sovereignty, territorial integrity, and shared objectives for security and prosperity in the Central Asia region.  We will continue to encourage political participation for the people of Turkmenistan, bolstering the role of civil society, and strengthening our shared interests.

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