October 1, 2022

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Mauritius National Day

12 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States of America, I congratulate the Mauritian people on their 54th anniversary of their independence.

As a fellow multi-cultural democracy, the United States values our bilateral relationship which is built on shared democratic principles, respect for human rights, and care for the environment.  The United States applauds the Mauritian government’s focus on strengthening financial systems to support the global community in fighting illicit finance.

Best wishes to the Mauritian people on this special day.

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Source: Network News
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