December 10, 2022

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Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Uzbekistani Foreign Minister Kamilov

11 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken met today with Uzbekistani Foreign Minister Abdulaziz Kamilov in Washington, D.C.  Noting the two countries’ active cooperation bilaterally and through the C5+1 regional diplomatic platform, the Secretary thanked Foreign Minister Kamilov for Uzbekistan’s continued partnership.  The Secretary emphasized that Russia’s premeditated, unprovoked, and unjustified attack on Ukraine is a flagrant violation of international law and underscored the urgency of broad support for a rules-based order.  The Secretary commended Uzbekistan’s humanitarian support for the people of Ukraine and Afghanistan and reiterated the United States’ intention to never allow terrorists to use Afghanistan as a safehaven.  The Secretary encouraged continued progress on Uzbekistan’s reform agenda, including improving the business climate, promoting rule of law, and protecting human rights and fundamental freedoms.  He reaffirmed U.S. support for Uzbekistan’s sovereignty, independence, and territorial integrity.

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