October 2, 2022

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Welcoming the Launch of UN Consultations on Yemen

18 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

The United States welcomes today’s launch of inclusive consultations by UN Special Envoy for Yemen Hans Grundberg.  Through consultations with a wide range of Yemeni political and civil society groups over the next few weeks, the UN Special Envoy seeks to finalize a new, comprehensive peace process framework. These consultations provide a valuable opportunity for Yemenis to discuss a renewed vision for a political resolution to the conflict.

We call on all Yemeni groups to participate fully, meaningfully, and in good faith in the UN consultations. There is no military solution to the Yemen conflict; the only path forward is through dialogue and compromise. The destruction and suffering caused by over seven years of war is overwhelming. The parties must put the interest of the Yemeni people first and seize this opportunity to help bring this conflict to an end.

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