October 2, 2022

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Public Schedule – March 9, 2022

14 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

***THE DAILY PUBLIC SCHEDULE IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE***

SECRETARY ANTONY J. BLINKEN

10:00 a.m. Secretary Blinken meets with UK Foreign Secretary Elizabeth Truss at the Department of State.

(POOLED CAMERA SPRAY AT TOP)

11:15 a.m. Secretary Blinken holds a joint press availability with UK Foreign Secretary Elizabeth Truss at the Department of State.

(POOLED PRESS COVERAGE)

The joint press availability will be livestreamed on www.state.gov and www.YouTube.com/statedept.

4:30 p.m. Secretary Blinken meets with Uzbekistan Foreign Minister Abdulaziz Kamilov at the Department of State.
(POOLED CAMERA SPRAY AT TOP)

DEPUTY SECRETARY WENDY R. SHERMAN

Deputy Secretary Sherman is on travel to Turkey, Spain, Morocco, Algeria, and Egypt March 4 – 11, 2022.  Please click here for more information.

DEPUTY SECRETARY FOR MANAGEMENT AND RESOURCES BRIAN P. MCKEON

Deputy Secretary McKeon attends meetings and briefings from the Department of State.

UNDER SECRETARY FOR POLITICAL AFFAIRS VICTORIA J. NULAND

2:00 p.m. Under Secretary Nuland meets with African Union Commissioner for Political Affairs, Peace, and Security Adeoye Bankole at the Department of State.
(CLOSED PRESS COVERAGE)

ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR WESTERN HEMISPHERE AFFAIRS BRIAN A. NICHOLS

Assistant Secretary Nichols is on travel to Chile from March 7-9, 2022. Please click here for more information.

ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR CONFLICT AND STABILIZATION OPERATIONS ANNE WITKOWSKY

Assistant Secretary Witkowsky is on travel to Haiti from March 7-9, 2022.  Please click here for more information.

BRIEFING SCHEDULE

2:30 p.m. Department Press Briefing with Spokesperson Ned Price.
(POOLED PRESS COVERAGE)

The Department Press Briefing will be livestreamed on www.state.gov

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