December 2, 2022

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Deputy Secretary Sherman’s Meeting with Foreign Minister Bourita of Morocco

17 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Deputy Secretary of State Wendy Sherman met today with Moroccan Foreign Minister Nasser Bourita in Rabat.  Deputy Secretary Sherman and Foreign Minister Bourita discussed ways to further enhance the long-standing bilateral relationship between the United States and Morocco, including shared interests in regional peace, security and prosperity.  The Deputy Secretary and Foreign Minister also discussed international developments, including Putin’s premeditated, unprovoked and unjustified war on Ukraine.  The Deputy Secretary and the Foreign Minister expressed strong support for the United Nations Personal Envoy of the Secretary-General Staffan de Mistura, who is seeking to reinvigorate the UN-led political process for Western Sahara.  The Deputy Secretary noted that we continue to view Morocco’s autonomy plan as serious, credible, and realistic, and a potential approach to satisfy the aspirations of the people of Western Sahara.  The Deputy Secretary and Foreign Minister also discussed the importance of protecting human rights, including freedom of expression, building on the productive September 2021 U.S.-Morocco dialogue on human rights.

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