September 28, 2022

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U.S.-Djibouti Bi-National Forum

10 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

Assistant Secretary for African Affairs Molly Phee and Djiboutian Foreign Minister Mahmoud Ali Youssouf concluded the 6th annual U.S.-Djibouti Bi-National Forum today.  In these high-level discussions launched by Secretary of State Anthony Blinken on February 4, Assistant Secretary Phee and Foreign Minister Youssouf reviewed the longstanding bilateral partnership between the United States and Djibouti and the broad range of security, economic, and development cooperation that encompasses the U.S.-Djibouti bilateral relationship.  They also discussed areas of collaboration to further regional peace, stability, and prosperity in the Horn of Africa.

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