October 2, 2022

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Assistant Secretary of State for International Organization Affairs Michele J. Sison’s Travel to Montreal

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Office of the Spokesperson

Assistant Secretary of State for International Organization Affairs Michele J. Sison will travel to Montreal, Quebec, Canada March 1-2.  This will be the Assistant Secretary’s first visit to Montreal in her current role.

While in Montreal, Assistant Secretary Sison will meet with senior officials from the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), including President of the ICAO Council Salvatore Sciacchitano and ICAO Secretary General Juan Carlos Salazar.  The Assistant Secretary will also meet with Ambassador C.B. “Sully” Sullenberger, U.S. Representative to the ICAO.

For updates, follow @State_IO on Twitter.

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