December 2, 2022

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Attorney General Merrick B. Garland Statement on President Biden’s Nomination of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to the Supreme Court

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Attorney General Merrick B. Garland released the following statement regarding the President’s nomination of Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to be Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court:

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