October 3, 2022

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Assistant Secretary for South and Central Asian Affairs Lu’s Travel to California

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Office of the Spokesperson

Assistant Secretary for South and Central Asian Affairs Donald Lu will travel to California February 23-25, 2022, to participate in outreach to key domestic constituents in the Bay Area. The Assistant Secretary will engage diaspora, venture capital, industry, and tech leaders, as well as stakeholders and elected officials involved in Afghan resettlement in California. These meetings will provide opportunities to reinforce public-private cooperation, to expand U.S. business engagement in South and Central Asia, and to consult with stakeholders about the Afghan resettlement process.

Additionally, the trip will focus specifically on opportunities to support women’s economic advancement through public-private partnerships, like the U.S.-Pakistan Women’s Council and U.S.-India Alliance for Women’s Economic Empowerment.

Assistant Secretary Lu’s engagements in California will be the first of several domestic outreach programs in 2022 which aim to connect U.S. foreign policy with the broad American public.

For media inquiries please contact SCA-Press@state.gov.

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