December 1, 2022

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Secretary Antony J. Blinken And French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian Before Their Meeting

17 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

Munich, Germany

Hotel Bayerischer Hof

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Well, good morning, everyone.  It’s a particular pleasure to be able to spend some time with my good friend Jean-Yves Le Drian and for us to be able to compare notes on many different issues, the first of which, of course, is the situation in and around Ukraine and Russia’s aggression, but also many other issues of shared concern going all the way from the Sahel to the Middle East and beyond.  So I’m looking forward to a good conversation.  We’ll also be spending time together at the meeting of the G7 foreign ministers in a couple of hours, but it’s very good to see Jean-Yves and to be able to pursue what has been a permanent conversation between us on all of the issues that really matter to the United States and France.

FOREIGN MINISTER LE DRIAN:  (Via interpreter) Well, I’m very pleased now to meet Tony once again because of all the difficult issues of the moment.  We have a very strong relationship which I could summarize in two words: trust and transparency.

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Thank you all.

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