December 1, 2022

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Polish Foreign Minister Rau

17 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with Polish Foreign Minister Zbigniew Rau. Secretary Blinken welcomed the Foreign Minister’s engagement in Kyiv and Moscow and expressed his support for Foreign Minister Rau’s initiative to launch a Renewed European Security Dialogue at the OSCE. The Secretary reiterated his commitment to Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity and determination to deter and defend against further Russian aggression. The Secretary thanked the Foreign Minister for Poland’s assistance with U.S. citizens who are leaving Ukraine.

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