December 6, 2022

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Transatlantic Quad Foreign Ministers

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian, German Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock, and UK Foreign Secretary Elizabeth Truss to further coordinate implementation of the massive consequences and severe costs to be imposed if Russia invades Ukraine.  All parties expressed resolute support for Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity and commitment to strong transatlantic coordination to counter Russia’s threats against Ukraine and European security.

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