October 3, 2022

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Deputy Secretary Sherman’s Call with Canadian Deputy Foreign Minister Morgan

12 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Deputy Secretary of State Wendy Sherman spoke today with Canadian Deputy Foreign Minister Marta Morgan to follow up on previous conversations on Russia’s escalating aggression against Ukraine.  The Deputy Secretary and Deputy Foreign Minister discussed efforts to urge Russia to de-escalate and choose diplomacy.  They reiterated that further Russian escalation would be met with massive, coordinated consequences and severe costs for the Russian Federation.  Both expressed the United States’ and Canada’s resolute support for Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity and commitment to strong transatlantic coordination.  The Deputy Secretary also thanked DFM Morgan for Canada’s actions over the weekend to resolve the situation at the Ambassador Bridge.  They discussed the importance of a quick and peaceful resolution to ensure the free flow of goods and legitimate travel across the border.

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