October 4, 2022

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Is Donald Trump a smart and violent man or just a violent man?

14 min read

 

Trump pushes violence against journalists after MSNBC’s Ali Velshi got shot for covering a peaceful protest. John Iadarola and Francesca Fiorentini break it down on The Damage Report.
Follow The Damage Report on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDamageRep… 

“MSNBC said President Trump is endangering journalists and undermining freedoms after he told a crowd at a rally that it was a “beautiful sight” when one of the network’s anchors, Ali Velshi, was shot with a rubber bullet during a protest over the death of George Floyd. “Freedom of the press is a pillar of our democracy. When the president mocks a journalist for the injury he sustained while putting himself in harm’s way to inform the public, he endangers thousands of other journalists and undermines our freedoms,” MSNBC said in a statement Saturday.” #TheDamageReport #JohnIadarola #TheYoungTurks

 

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