December 6, 2022

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AZ GOP Leaders Shred Cyber Ninjas Fraudit Report

17 min read

The long-anticipated Arizona audit is here. And it shouldn’t surprise anyone that it’s just another iteration of the Big Lie that Donald Trump won the 2020 election. Two Republican elections officials in Arizona, Bill Gates and Stephen Richer, are calling out the audit for what it is: a fraud, a sham, and a multimillion-dollar grift. News Source: The Republican Accountability Project

Donald Trump Terrorist Attacks on the U.S.

U.S. Veterans
Veterans Watch

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